OUTER DARKNESS: What is it?

It is interesting to note that Matthew contains 6 out of the 7 instances where OUTER DARNESS is mentioned.  The context surrounding the first instance is found in (Matthew 8:5-13) in the story of the Centurion’s slave being healed.  Here we learn, the Centurion understood authority and told Jesus that He did not need to actually come to his home in order to heal him; Jesus only needed to speak the word and it would happen.  Jesus’ response was as follows…

“He marveled and said to those who were following, ‘Truly I say to you, I have not found such great faith with anyone in Israel.  I say to you that many will come from east and west, and recline at the table with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven; but the sons of the kingdom will be cast out into the outer darkness; in that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’” (Matthew 8:5-13)

The first thing to notice is that the thrust of the warning concerns being rejected for participation in the banquet of the heavenly kingdom.  It certainly includes the dire consequences of that rejection, but the focus is on what they are missing out on, which is why there is weeping and gnashing of teeth.  It is a picture of mourning and great regret.  Again, they are weeping for what they missed out on, not for what they are enduring.

The second thing to notice is that it concerns (at that time) God’s People!  It was not a warning to the godless pagans.  Rather, it is a warning to His followers, who had utterly neglected something very important that God requires from His children.  The Jews were rejected by God for their stubborn refusal to share their revelation of God with outsiders.  In fact they ended up crucifying their own Messiah out of their jealousy over Him welcoming outsiders.  Christ came to show that God’s heart is for all people, the Jews however wanted to keep God and His promises all for themselves and see the rest of the world shut out. Just a cusery read of the jewish Talmud will reveal their hatred and disdain for any non-jew and especially for Jesus Christ their Messiah.

John Lightfoot in his Commentary on the New Testament From the Talmud and Hebraica, Volume 2, pg. 163 says the following concerning this verse and specifically the phrase “outer darkness,”

“For whatsoever ‘outer darkness’ signifies, whether the ‘darkness of the heathen’ (for to the Jews the heathen were ‘those that are without’) or the darkness beyond that…our Savior clearly intimates the Jews were thither to be banished.”

This is important because Scripture does not convey the idea that outer darkness is Hell, but rather the idea of being rejected and cut off from God, the true light. In the kingdom of Christ upon the earth, when the NEW JERUSALEM comes down to reside on earth, in that celestial city there is no TEMPLE for the Lamb will be light, and no one who is defiled or failed to live a sanctified life will ever be permitted to enter that wonderful place. Revelation was considered ‘light’ and the Jews prided themselves as being in the light, having received up to that point, in Jesus time, the greatest revelation of God.  They considered all others to be blind for all the heathen see is darkness, they don’t have the light of God’s revelation.  Which I might add was Israel’s very calling, to bring the light to the rest of the darkened world. Therefore, this parable has a dual application. It concerned the physical jews in Jesus day, but also applies to those of us who are born again through the seed of Christ (spiritual Israel).

Revelation 21:22-27
I saw no temple in it , for the Lord God, the Almighty, and the Lamb, are its temple. The city has no need for the sun, neither of the moon, to shine, for the very glory of God illuminated it, and its lamp is the Lamb. The nations will walk in its light. The kings of the earth bring the glory and honor of the nations into it. Its gates will in no way be shut by day, for there will be no night there, and they shall bring the glory and the honor of the nations into it so that they may enter. There will in no way enter into it anything profane, or one who causes an abomination or a lie, but only those who are written in the Lamb’s book of life. WEB
(World English Bible)

So to be cast into the outer darkness signified that the Jewish nation at that time was going to lose what little light they had.  They were going to be in the same boat as the rest of the lost and darkened world.  The Jews were very shortly going to reject their own Messiah and miss out on the next stage of the Kingdom of heaven (the outpouring of the Spirit at Pentecost and the subsequent fellowship of God in the Church Age).  And ultimately they will miss out on the fullness of the Kingdom when Christ Returns.

I believe that the outer darkness is not speaking about Hell, but being “outside” of the privilege of God’s illumination, or revelation.  And it is this warning that we ought to apply to ourselves as Christians.  We cannot treat these warnings as if they only apply to the lost and unsaved, for they are already in the outer darkness.  No, this warning, once given to the Jewish body, now applies to the Christian body at large.

Even children of God, His people, His body – the Church, believers, Christians, etc… will be held to a certain level of accountability.  What that entails exactly will not be addressed here, but it should be the concern of every serious follower of Christ.

It is not my intention to scare anyone, nor to cause those who might be weak in faith to become anxious with fear.  The issue that I really want the reader to come away with, in understanding what is really being addressed in these phrases – is that this warning is directed towards followers of God, not the unbelieving world, and as such holds a very real application for His people.  Because of this fact it therefore does not fit with our modern concept of Hell.  And as you will see, every single instance where Christ refers to “weeping and gnashing of teeth,” “the outer darkness” or “the furnace of fire” – concerns what we would call “God’s” people – not heathens.

The King’s Wedding Feast

Lets look at the next instance of this phrase, which is found in Matthew 22:1-14.  It arrives in the midst of a particular parable that Jesus was giving to point out the fact that those who think they are part of God’s Kingdom will soon find that they were left out due to their inability to honor God by putting Him first.  It is the parable of the wedding feast, where those invited made excuses not to come, so the king, being offended and dishonored, decided to open the banquet to those who would do anything to come – the poor and homeless.   Since they were not people of privilege, they would see it as a great honor to be invited and would certainly not refuse.  The rest of the text is as follows,

“But when the king came in to look over the dinner guests, he saw a man there who was not dressed in wedding clothes, and he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you come in here without wedding clothes?’ And the man was speechless. Then the king said to the servants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, and throw him into the outer darkness; in that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ For many are called, but few are chosen.”

This again is not addressing heathens, but those who are called of God.  Jesus was saying that being called isn’t enough, b/c of those who are called, only a few will actually be chosen.  Not only were those originally invited excluded (which I believe refers to the “calling” on the Jewish nation, for they were certainly “called”), but even this unworthy fellow who was given such a privilege and even called a “friend” showed no respect to the King by his refusal to dress appropriately.  This is a highly effective example of dishonor.  Anyone in that culture upon hearing this parable would instantly recognize the offense.  For them, dishonoring your host, especially if he was royalty, was incomprehensible.   In that day you wore your best when invited for a feast, the fact that this man did not, especially for the King, showed his complete disrespect for all that the King stood for.

The parable is meant to show what disqualifies one from participation in the Kingdom and their sorrow over what they will lose, not what they will suffer.  And those of us who have been blessed to be part of the ingathering of the Gentiles must be aware that we too can lose our calling through dishonorable actions and attitudes.

The Talents and the King’s Servants

The next reference is found in Matthew 25:14-30 where Jesus is again giving a parable.  This parable concerns 3 servants of a certain man who gave each servant a certain amount of “talents.”  Luke records this same parable with different details in 19:11-27.  In Luke’s account the man is a nobleman, or royalty.  In other words he was a potential king.  He then goes on a long trip to a far away place to receive a kingdom (read Jesus and His going to heaven until His Return).  On His Return He examines His servants’ use of the talents.  2 were wise, 1 was foolish.  In the parable, the King then judges His foolish servant.  Here is the end of it as Matthew records it.

“Therefore take away the talent from him, and give it to the one who has the ten talents.’  For to everyone who has, more shall be given, and he will have an abundance; but from the one who does not have, even what he does have shall be taken away. Throw out the worthless slave into the outer darkness; in that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

It is not difficult to notice that this parable concerns servants of a King, not enemies.  God’s children are the servants, not unbelievers, not the secular population, but Christians!  It once again is not a threat of judgment on the unsaved populace, but upon God’s own people who have been given certain talents to invest in a hostile environment until His Return.

In Luke’s account the conflict of the parable concerns the servants who, in dealing business in their King’s name, will invite trouble upon themselves.  Their environment is hostile b/c the parable makes it clear that the townsfolk did not want Him to reign over them.  The townspeople were hoping that the king would not win the petition to inherit the kingdom.  So during His absence there was a lot of tension between those who supported the possible future King and those who did not.  The potential King would have most assuredly taken His army with Him, which would have left the servants in a somewhat defenseless position.  The foolish servant was being selfishly wise by refraining from making his allegiance public.  He was trying to remain neutral in order to survive.  But this proved to be to his detriment.  That is why the king praises His servants for their faithfulness, not their success.  He was testing their allegiance to Him in the face of great hostility.

The application is obvious.  We are the servants who have been left on earth to occupy and invest with His down payment (the Spirit; see Ephesians 1:14; 2 Corinthians 1:22, 5:5).  The townspeople symbolize the unbelieving world; which do not want Christ to reign over them.  If we, His servants, choose to remain inconspicuous to the world, refusing to take a stand for our King and His agenda, then we will lose out on inheriting the world when He returns.

This interpretation is confirmed by the fact that the “King” (Jesus) puts the wise servants in charge of cities, for we will inherit the earth and rule with Him over it (see Matthew 5:5; 2 Timothy 2:12; Revelation 5:10, 20:6 and 1 Corinthians 6:2).  Furthermore there is a definite difference between the judgment upon the foolish servant and the judgment on the townspeople who didn’t want Him to reign over them.  The foolish servant gets the outer darkness, while the townsfolk get gathered together and slain in the King’s presence!

For those interested in a superb exposition on this parable, see Kenneth Bailey’s remarkable book Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes, pgs 397-409.

While Matthew excludes the detail about the man being a king as well as the details about the townsfolk who don’t want Him to rule over them, Matthew’s record immediately follows this parable with statements from Jesus concerning His Return and His enthronement, which is a very clear picture of Kingship (vs. 31-46).  Christ then proceeds to declare that from His throne He will judge the sheep and the goats.  This is probably the most popular portion of the Bible mistakenly thought to prove an endless judgment (we will look at that in greater detail in the next series, which concerns judgment).

The only problem is that sheep and goats are both clean animals!  They are both types and shadows of Christ, and by extension His Body.  Nothing can be considered clean unless it has been cleansed by the blood of Christ.  The goats are also a part of God’s body, cleansed like the sheep, albeit more rough.  They did not understand His heart and mind towards the lost.

Conclusion:

In this study of Scripture we see that the “outer darkness” rather than being a reference to Hell, is referring to losing the light of God’s special revelation (which is progressive).  It is not a reference to some dark aspect of Hell, for Hell is a place of fire not darkness.

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